ABED Strategies for Building Allyship: Finding an Appropriate Role for non-Indigenous People in the Complicated Work of Decolonization and Indigenization

Almost everyone recognizes the incumbency to decolonize and Indigenize our schools.  We also recognize that this process must to be led by Indigenous people.  But we can’t leave the full burden on Indigenous people’s shoulders. In this workshop we discuss appropriate strategies for building allyship.  We engage with complicated and sensitive issues like: Who get to decide if someone is or isn’t an ally?  How can I become an ally?  What is the role of an ally? How can I contribute to decolonization? How can I support Indigenization?  If you are looking for ways to build allyship and networks for action in support of decolonization and Indigenization, this workshop is for you.

Target Audience

All Grades K-12

Sessions

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

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Presenter

  • Keith Carlson

    Keith Thor Carlson is a professor of History at theUniversity of the Fraser Valley, as well as Canada Research Chair in Indigenous and Community-Engaged History. Prior to taking up his position there, Keith worked as a professor of history at the University of Saskatchewan and, before that, as historical research coordinator for the Sto:lo Tribal Council in the Fraser Valley for a decade.  His research remains anchored in the Coast Salish world where he continues to work closely with Indigenous knowledge keepers.  In 2001 he was made an honorary member of the Sto:lo Nation. His research seeks to try and understand history from the perspective of Indigenous people, and aspires to help build cross-cultural understanding and reconciliation. He has authored, co-authored, or edited nine books and numerous articles. Among his publications are the award winning Sto:lo-Coast Salish Historical Atlas (2001), The Power of Place the Problem of Time: Aboriginal Identity and Historical Consciousness in the Cauldron of Colonialism (2010), and Towards a Nee Ethnohistory: Community-Engaged Scholarship Among the People of the River (2018).